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Just about right or exactly wrong?
Study about Sales Management and Marketing for Logistics Service Providers

Together with Miebach Consulting and DVZ 200 managers and employees in charge of sales and marketing at German logisticians were interviewed on the subject sales management and marketing. By this third study within 7 years, the core portion of it has come to offer a representative snapshot of sales and marketing in the logistics sector.

When it comes to sales and marketing in the logistics industry, expectations are arguably higher now than ever before. Achieving profitable, sustainable growth calls for doing more with the same resources – or in many cases actually with less. Read on and discover to what extent these developments make it possible to better link financial indicators and customer information with each other in order to achieve greater success in implementing sales and marketing strategies.

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Preview

A fundamental analysis of the markets should form the basis for all sales and marketing activities. Solid information on customer needs and requirements, a provider’s own position within the market, trends, and competitors’ positions is essential. It is only possible to define a sales and marketing strategy that makes it possible to utilize resources efficiently and effectively if that strategy is based on current, reliable, and objective data. When asked which tools they use most for market analysis purposes, more than 70 % of survey respondents answered that they rely on existing sources of information …

German logistics service providers typically take a systematic approach to studying and evaluating customers (…) Nonetheless, however, it is often past experience that leads providers to focus on certain customers. Even when facts and figures are present, subjective assessments are preferred. Customers’ financial value is relevant, and respondents indicate that they often know each customer’s value and also have a solid understanding of the value of customer segments. The difference between the respondents who know these values and those that merely estimate them is not very large, so we can conclude that monetary, fact-based evaluation of customer relationships hardly ever takes place.

  • Cover Page
  • Preface
  • Agenda
  • Study Results
  • Aspects